Laylo launches new Provence rosé wine – in a sustainable and stylish box

Laura and Laura started Laylo in 2020

Laura and Laura started Laylo in 2020 - Credit: Archant

Laura Riches and Laura Rosenberger founded luxury boxed wine brand Laylo in 2020

The Provence-style rose wine comes in an eye-catching box

The Provence-style rose wine comes in an eye-catching box - Credit: Archant

After working together at Naked Wines and becoming friends on a work trip to France, the two friends started their own business after realising they had both had the same idea – to create a premium boxed wine that people would be proud to drink and enjoy with others. This summer they launched their sustainable Provence-style rosé, made from 100% Grenache grapes grown in the UNESCO protected Luberon National Park, which comes in a box with an eye-catching design intended to evoke the glamour of the French Riviera. Here they tell us about working with French winemakers and their commitment to improving wine packaging.

What gave you the idea for Laylo?

We love wine, both personally and professionally, but the industry can be very traditional. When thinking about starting our own business, we wanted to be where the innovation was happening, which is undoubtedly alternative packaging formats. We did lots of research into cans, pouches and PET but it kept coming back to box... Better for the planet and better suited to the way we live our lives. Win win. Boxed wine has an image problem, as a result of years of “cheap plonk” sitting on the bottom shelf in the supermarket. We set ourselves the challenge to ‘make boxed wine cool’ – and so Laylo was born.

The packaging design tells the story of Laylo's wines and winemakers

The packaging design tells the story of Laylo's wines and winemakers - Credit: Archant

Why was the sustainable/eco-friendly aspect important for you?

We believe that all businesses have a responsibility to consider their impact on the environment, but we also don’t think consumers should have to compromise as a result. The most important thing is that our wines taste amazing. The fact that they generate 90% less carbon than glass bottles is the icing on the cake.

How did you decide on your packaging and what do you hope it will achieve?

We try to create designs that tell the story of our wines and winemakers. For example, our Loire Sauvignon Blanc uses the iconic French Toile de Jouy pattern, whereas the Sicilian Vino Rosso draws inspiration from the island’s volcanic marble. The design of the Lot #4: Rosé Méditerranée evokes the timeless glamour of the French Riviera. It’s inspired by a dusky pink vintage scarf, with unashamedly glitzy gold detailing that wouldn’t look out of place on the red carpet at Cannes. The roses in the design reflect the floral, fresh wine inside. And if you look closely, you’ll spot golden suns and crescent moons – a nod to the Grenache grapes ripened by the Mediterranean sunshine, then harvested under moonlight to preserve their crisp elegance.

How did you choose the French vineyard to work with for your rosé wine, and how involved were you in the creative process?

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This Provence-style rose was sourced for us by Clem Yates (MW) from a winery that she has been working with over the past 15 years. We loved it from the first sip – a burst of red fruit flavours on the tongue followed by a refreshing, zesty sweet lemon-like finish. We are very hands-on with the sourcing of all our wines. It’s not unusual for us to taste a line-up of over 20 samples, which we’ve sourced from our winemaker connections and Clem’s amazing network. Our top priority is that the wines are high quality and compare favourably to the sorts of wines you’d spend over £12 per bottle to buy at fancy wine merchants.

How much time do you spend in France?

We first became friends in France! Laura Riches had just joined Naked Wines in March 2016, and the two of us spent several days driving (badly!) around vineyards, meeting winemakers and filming marketing content. It was so much fun. Unfortunately, since starting Laylo we haven’t been able to travel to France, but as soon as it’s feasible to do so, we plan to visit our winemakers in the Loire and Provence. Partly for work reasons, but mainly to say thank you for believing in our lockdown project! laylo.com

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