15 French idioms featuring parts of the body

PUBLISHED: 16:03 01 September 2021 | UPDATED: 16:06 01 September 2021

15 French idioms with parts of the body

15 French idioms with parts of the body

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Brush up your human anatomy vocabulary and expand your knowledge of French idioms at the same time

Ne pas avoir la langue dans sa poche

Literal translation: To not have your tongue in your pocket

English equivalent: To never be at a loss for words

Rebattre les oreilles

Literal translation: To beat the ears

English equivalent: To harp on about something

To wear your heart on your sleeve © Svetlana Shamhurina © Getty ImagesTo wear your heart on your sleeve © Svetlana Shamhurina © Getty Images

Avoir le cœur sur la main

Literal translation: To have the heart on the hand

English equivalent: To wear your heart on your sleeve

Se creuser la tête

Literal translation: To dig in one’s head

English equivalent: To rack your brains

Les doigts dans le nez

Literal translation: Fingers in the nose

English equivalent: With one hand tied behind your back, to be a piece of cake

Prendre ses jambes à son cou

Literal translation: To take one’s legs to one’s neck

English equivalent: To run for your life

To be well connected © Dorian2013 Getty ImagesTo be well connected © Dorian2013 Getty Images

Avoir le bras long

Literal translation: To have a long arm

English equivalent: To be well connected

Mettre le pied à l’étrier

Literal translation: To put the foot in the stirrup

English equivalent: To get a foot on the ladder

To cost an arm and a leg © dickcraft Getty ImagesTo cost an arm and a leg © dickcraft Getty Images

Coûter les yeux de la tête

Literal translation: To cost the eyes of the head

English equivalent: To cost an arm and a leg

Sauter aux yeux

Literal translation: To jump to the eyes

English equivalent: To be blindingly obvious

To eat on the run © dima sidelnikov Getty ImagesTo eat on the run © dima sidelnikov Getty Images

Manger sur la pouce

Literal translation: To eat on the thumb

English equivalent: To eat on the run

Dormir sur ses deux oreilles

Literal translation: To sleep on two ears

English equivalent: To sleep soundly, like a log

To pluck up the courage © Pretty Vectors Getty ImagesTo pluck up the courage © Pretty Vectors Getty Images

Prendre son courage à deux mains

Literal translation: To take one’s courage in two hands

English equivalent: To pluck up the courage

Avoir les dents qui rayent le parquet

Literal translation: To have teeth that scrape the parquet

English equivalent: To be power hungry

Avoir un cheveu sur la langue

Literal translation: To have a hair on the tongue

English equivalent: To lisp

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