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Things to consider before buying a renovation project in France

PUBLISHED: 17:26 26 June 2017 | UPDATED: 17:27 26 June 2017

A successful renovation project in France lead by Trevor Morris

A successful renovation project in France lead by Trevor Morris

Archant

Renovation projects often come with a very attractive price tag, but how do you know the work needed to make it your dream home won’t be costing you a fortune? Here are 7 things to think about before buying a property to renovate in France

1. The foundations

In general, concrete foundations are relatively rare in French character properties. Most stone houses in the countryside are built without classic foundations. The walls have been excavated down to stable ground and built up using large stones at the base with local mud or clay used as a binding mortar. This type of construction is prone to movement and can absorb climatic changes such as canicules (heat waves), which can shrink soils and crack buildings. These buildings move with the land and evidence of cracks in facades (especially rendered ones) are not necessarily cause for alarm, and can be corrected cosmetically. Having said that, cracks can also be evidence of serious movement so don’t hesitate to seek professional advice.

TOP TIP

It is advisable to obtain more than one quote for the work you want done and compare them carefully.

2. The shape of the building

It sounds obvious, but stand back, ignore the details and just look at the shape of the building. Does it look right? Do the walls look perpendicular? Is the roof in a reasonably straight line? A wall leaning outwards could be an indication of something more serious happening inside, for example a beam that tied the walls together could have rotted, or a roof beam could have collapsed causing pressures against the wall. A ‘bellied’ wall that bulges out also needs further investigation. It is often a sign that the building has spent some part of its life without a roof, which has allowed rain water to get into the walls and wash away the binding mortar, making the inner and outer skins part company. This can be extremely costly and dangerous to remedy.

TOP TIP

Ensure that your builder is properly registered in France with a SIRET number and has necessary insurance in place to guarantee their work (décennale) and cover against any damage caused during the works.

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Related articles

8 tips for renovating in France on a budget

7 questions to ask yourself before starting a renovation project in France

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A door and windows were added to the property's facade and the cement render was removed A door and windows were added to the property's facade and the cement render was removed

3. The roof

Many old roofs are not completely straight and this is not always a problem. Timber sags with time and this can be part of the charm, but if most of the roof follows a certain shape and then has a significant dip in one place, this probably indicates a failed roof beam and is an indicator of expensive times to come.

TOP TIP

Be ready to commit time, money and emotional energy to the project.

4. The costs

If you think you are going to make changes to the property then be prepared to spend some money. To carry out a decent renovation there is very little middle ground – it is generally either a case of a coat of paint and some light works, or a full renovation. You can’t put new bathrooms on sagging floors or connect new kitchens to outdated plumbing and electrics. A good rule of thumb when making your first estimations is a cost of €1,000 to €1,500 per square metre of habitable surface for full renovation costs. This is a realistic starting point, and you may well be able to bring your project in for less than this amount, but at least you shouldn’t have a nasty surprise.

TOP TIP

‘Habitable’ does not necessarily mean a house you would want to live in.

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Related articles

Ways to save money when renovating a property

7 reasons to buy a French property to renovate

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An entire floor was added to the original single-storey extension An entire floor was added to the original single-storey extension

5. Ask the right questions

When looking at ‘renovated’ properties that may need some extra work, you should be asking yourself a number of questions. Did qualified artisans carry out the work? Can any relevant paperwork be provided, such as planning permission, receipts, and a 10- year warranty (decennale), or did the previous owner do the work? In the case of the latter, ask the owner/seller questions about where they sourced materials and how much experience they have of renovating. If it turns out that the work is not up to standard then you may find that everything has to be ripped out before you can start anew, in which case it would have been cheaper to buy a ruin.

TOP TIP

Be realistic about costs – €1,000-€1,500/m2 is a good rule of thumb

6. Is the property right for you?

Take a long hard look at the property and think about exactly what you want from it, and see if the two match in any way. If you have a large extended family or groups of friends that you enjoy entertaining, then a two-bedroom cottage with a tiny kitchen is not going to cut the mustard without major works. Anything can be done when it comes to building work, but at a cost. It is always going to be easier and therefore less expensive if you can work with the flow of the building. Putting in an en-suite bathroom is going to be straightforward if it is at the same end of the house as the rest of the plumbing, but likely to be costly if floors have to be dug up to join it to the rest of the plumbing system.

TOP TIP

Be wary of previous renovation work

7. Ask for help

If things do not look quite right then call in an expert to advise you. Building surveyors as such do not exist in France in the same way as in the UK. Your best bet is to call in a local reputable builder who will know the local building methods and geography. He should be able to tell you if things are serious or not and what the remedies are, and will also be able to give you a quote (devis) so that you know what costs will be involved. Often we only listen to the advice we want to hear, so it’s worth taking someone neutral along with you to the property and asking them what they think. Once you’ve asked a lot of questions, listened to a lot of advice and given it plenty of thought, you’ll be ready to make a decision.

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